What do international justice experts really think of The Hague’s institutions?  

The guests featured Shadi Sadr, human rights lawyer and PhD candidate at Leiden University; Benjamin Duerr, German-Dutch international lawyer and diplomat; Leila Sadat, award-winning academic in international law, international criminal law, and human rights academic; and Andrea Lapunzina Veronelli, Legal Counsel at the Permanent Court of Arbitration.

From left to right: Leila Sadat, Benjamin Duerr, Shadi Sadr, Andrea Lapunzina Veronelli and Janet Anderson

A renewal of trust 

The conversation featured many critical junctures in the current structure that upheld the prosecution of international crimes, with critical insights into atrocity crimes and their validity.  

The overall sentiment of the discourse framed the current system in a positive way, with a renewal of trust in the institutions operating daily for a more peaceful and just world.

Does the distress of a population necessarily have to be labeled a genocide to be valid in the public eye? Nowadays it seems so, but our distinguished speakers emphasized how this is not what should be followed. Every crime needs to be prosecuted, and no crime should necessarily be a genocide for the law to do its course. 

The overall sentiment of the discourse framed the current system in a positive way, with a renewal of trust in the institutions operating daily for a more peaceful and just world. To learn more about what these international justice experts think of The Hague’s institutions, give the recording of this Live Podcast a listen and find out.  

Recommendations 

The conversation closed with a couple of literary and cinematographic recommendations from our guests as well as the engaged public. The recorded version can be found here.  

Here you can find a brief list: 

Books: 

  • The Internationalists: How a Radical Plan to Outlaw War Remade the World, by Oona A. Hataway and Scott J. Shapiro (2017). 
  • The Origins of Totalitarianism, Hanna Arendt (1951). 
  • Judgement at Tokyo: World War II on Trial and the Making of Modern Asia, Gary J. Bass (2024). 
  • Caring and the Law, Jonathan Herring (2013).  
  • The Return: Fathers, Sons and the Land in Between, Hisham Matar (2016). 
  • The Last Colony, Philippe Sands (2023). 
  • Against the World: Anti-Globalism and Mass Politics Between the World Wars, Tara Zahra (2023). 

Movies: 

  • Stealing a Nation (2004). 
From left to right: Stephanie van den Berg, Leila Sadat, Benjamin Duerr, Shadi Sadr, Andrea Lapunzina Veronelli and Janet Anderson

This event was organized as a part of the 125th celebratory anniversary of The Hague as the city of peace and justice, marking the institution of the first international court in the city.  

To know more about the 125th anniversary and be up to date with any related initiatives, you can visit the Just Peace website.